Second Generation


5. Capt. John WILLIAMSON Jr.1,3,4,5,6,17,18,33,36,37,38,39,40 was born in 1771 in VA. He was taken prisoner by the Shawnee in 1782 in KY, Jefferson Co., Louisville, near Linn's station. He was captured at age 10 in the same Indian raid where his father and 2 brothers were killed and scalped. After being forced to run a gauntlet and undergoing purification rites, including having his ears notched and his nose pierced, he was adopted by the Shawnee and held by them for 3 years. He was ransomed for 24 jugs of whiskey by traders coming down the Ohio River from the Monongahela region of PA.
After being ransomed, he devoted the intervening years until his marriage to fighting Indians as a militiaman, usually in conjunction with his good friend and brother-in-law, Bland Williams Ballard. During this period and after, he fought in every major Indian skirmish, again with Ballard and his wife’s uncle, Aquilla Whitaker, until captured and burnt by Indians in the disastrous Battle of the Raisin River (Maumee River) near Detroit, MI in January 1813.
He served in the KY militia in 1785 in KY, Jefferson Co., Louisville, Linn's station. He joined the militia after being ransomed from Shawnee Indians who had captured him 4 years earlier. He served in the KY militia as scout for George Rogers Clark's Northwest Indian Campaign in 1786 in OH. John served in the KY militia in 1787–1792 in KY, Jefferson Co., Louisville, Linn's station. He served in the KY militia as scout for Gen. Wayne's campaign, Maj. Gen. Chas Scott, Maj. Notley Conn's Battln in 1793 in OH. He attained the ranks of Captain and Lieutenant in the Kentucky militia.
He served in the KY militia as scout in Gen. Anthony Wayne's campaign, Capt. Joshua Baker's Co. in 1794 in OH. John served in the KY mIlitia as a scout/spy at the Battle of Fallen Timbers, Maj. Conn's Battln, Capt. Joshua Baker's Co. on 21 October 1794 in OH. He was "one of the famous forty spies who changed the course of American history." He received no pension for this battle, however. He began a lawsuit against Richard Chenoweth in 1800 in KY, Jefferson Co., Louisville, near Linn's station. He battled with Richard Chenoweth in a 10 year court case over Chenoweth's usurption of Williamson land. In 1810 his case was upheld by the Appellate Court of Kentucky.
He lived in KY, Shelby Co. in 1800. His children first went to a little school "located on Clear Creek, two miles south of Shelbyville on land owned by William Shannon, and on what was later the farm of Doctor Elliott. The teacher’s name was Dillon. He was succeeded by Moses Cook, and they taught for short terms intermittently, between the arrival of the first settlers and the early nineties of 1700. The second school of which any record is found, was taught in a Presbyterian Church, built in 1798, on Dry Run, the teacher being Godfrey Ragsdale. Among his pupils were the children of Benj. Logan, later General Logan, James Shannon, John Williamson, Dan Colgan, Bland Ballard, Aquilla Whitaker and Samuel Shannon.
The church in which the school was taught was three miles southwest of the town and near what was later known as the Samuel Henderson farm. After the school taught by Professor Ragsdale, at Dry Run, possibly the next was taught by David Lock, at the west end of Shelbyville and antidated the one to the north of the town."
The WILLIAMSON vs CHENOWETH lawsuit was settled in Williamson's favor in April 1810 in KY, Shelby Co. He lived in KY, Shelby Co. in 1810. John served in the KY militia as a scout/spy at the Battle of Tippecanoe on 7 November 1811 in IN, Tippecanoe Co., Lafayette. He served in the KY militia under Col. John Allen, First Rifle Regiment, Capt. Bland Ballard's Co. on 10 August 1812 in MI, Wayne Co., near Detroit. He was mustered in as a Lieutenant in Major Bland Ballard's company. His term was from 10 Aug 1812-14 Oct 1812.
He served in the KY militia at the Battle of Raisin (Maumee) River on 21 January 1813 in MI, Wayne Co., near Detroit. In a letter to his uncle, John Richardson, a participant in the battle, wrote about the American volunteers' appearance, "...[they] had evidently undergone every change of season, and were arrived at the last stage of repair...it was the depth of winter, but scarcely an individual was in possession of a greatcoat or cloak, and few of them wore garments of wool of any description. They still retained their summer dress, consisting of cotton stuff of various colors, shaped into frocks, and descending to the knee; their trousers were of the same material. They were covered with slouched hats worn bare by constant use, beneath which their long hair fell matted and uncombed over their cheeks; and these together with the dirty blankets wrapped around their loins...and fastened by broad leathern belts into which were thrust axes and knives of an enormous length, gave them an air of wildness and savageness..." John died by being tortured and burned at the stake by Indians on 22 January 1813 in MI, Wayne Co., near Detroit. The American battle participants were subjected several fates. If they survived the battle and were not severely wounded, they were made prisoner and marched to the fort at Niagara. Some were adopted by the Indians to fill the place of fallen warriors. Some were simply killed, mutilated, and scalped.
The fate of the wounded was grim. The most severely wounded were left in huts near the battlefield, ostensibly to be put on sleds and taken to the fort at Detroit under British protection. The British withdrew, however, leaving the wounded prisoners at the mercy of the Indians, who promptly dragged out various injured men and proceeded to tomahawk them, mutilating their bodies (in many instances beheading them), and scalping them. The other unfortunates were burnt alive when the Indians set fire to the huts.
According to John's son, John Whitaker Williamson, John was taken prisoner and burnt at the stake. It is not known if he was wounded, but it is very probable, since few, if any, escaped without some bloodshed. Until as recently as 2008, John's method of death was in question, since no reports had been found of the Indians using burning at the stake immediately after the battle. However, in May 2009, a letter was discovered from A. B. Woodward, Judge of the Supreme Court of the Michigan Territory, to General Proctor, the commandant of the British, dated 3 Feb 1813 (just a few weeks after the battle), angrily stating that some of the prisoners, after their capitulation to the British due to promises of protection, had been tomahawked and shot, and "still others had been burned at the stake by the savages."


Capt. John WILLIAMSON Jr. and Charity WHITAKER were married on 19 August 1795 in KY, Shelby Co.. Charity WHITAKER17,18,19,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53,54 was born in 1777 in PA, Monongahela region. She lived in KY, Shelby Co. in 1810. Filed her husband's will in court in January 1814 in KY, Shelby Co. Filed an inventory of her husband's belongings on 12 February 1814 in KY, Shelby Co. She had her estate probated on 15 July 1816 in KY, Shelby Co.. Was made guardian of sons John, Bladen, Levi, Aquilla, Bland, and James in August 1816 in KY, Shelby Co. She is made guardian with apportion from rent of 56 acre farm during 1815 and 1816 amounting to $28.95 1/2 to be given to each son.
Filed a guardianship report on sons Bladen, Levi, Aquilla, Bland, and James in October 1818 in KY, Shelby Co. Son John is now of age. Other sons receive rent apportion of $153.72 1/2 each.
Filed a guardianship report on sons Bladen, Levi, Aquilla, Bland, and James in 1819 in KY, Shelby Co. Son John is now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Bladen, Levi, Aquilla, Bland, and James in 1820 in KY, Shelby Co. Son John is now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Charity lived in KY, Shelby Co. in 1820. There is a female aged 26-30 in the household. It is unclear if this is a daughter or not. She is not shown on previous censuses. One unproven report says there was a daughter, Martha, who died in her 20s. Filed a guardianship report on sons Bladen, Levi, Aquilla, Bland, and James in 1821 in KY, Shelby Co. Son John is now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Bladen, Levi, Aquilla, Bland, and James in 1822 in KY, Shelby Co. Son John is now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Levi, Aquilla, Bland, and James in August 1823 in KY, Shelby Co. Sons John and Bladen are now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Aquilla, Bland, and James in August 1824 in KY, Shelby Co. Sons John, Bladen, and Levi are now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Aquilla, Bland, and James in August 1825 in KY, Shelby Co. Sons John, Bladen, and Levi are now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Bland and James in August 1826 in KY, Shelby Co. Sons John, Bladen, Levi, and Aquilla are now of age. Rent apportion totals not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Bland and James in August 1827 in KY, Shelby Co. Sons John, Bladen, Levi, And Aquilla are now of age. Sons Bland and James did not receive any rent apportion. Reason is not known. Filed a guardianship report on sons Bland and James in August 1828 in KY, Shelby Co. Sons John, Bladen, Levi, and Aquilla are now of age. Sons Bland and James are given no rent apportion. No reason given. Filed a guardianship report on sons Bland and James in August 1829 in KY, Shelby Co. Sons John, Bladen, Levi, and Aquilla were now of age. Sons Bland and James received no rent apportion. Reason is not known. She was the daughter of the Rev. John Whitaker, pioneer preacher in Kentucky. Her uncle was the famous Indian fighter, Aquilla Whitaker. Aquilla Whitaker (her uncle), Major Bland Williams Ballard (her brother-in-law), and Capt. John Williamson Jr. (her husband), often fought together in Indian skirmishes and in some of the frontier's major Indian campaigns.


Capt. John WILLIAMSON Jr. and Charity WHITAKER had the following children:

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i.

Col. John Whitaker WILLIAMSON.

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ii.

Martha WILLIAMSON was born between 1797 and 1804 in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville. She died between 1797 and 1804 in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville. She is not shown on the 1800 or 1810 Shelby Co., KY censuses. On the 1820 census, she is shown as between the ages of 16-26. She is not shown on the guardianship papers which started in 1814.

Her brother John Whitaker Williamson, in a letter to Lyman Draper, states that she "died young."

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iii.

Bladen A. WILLIAMSON.

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iv.

Levi WILLIAMSON.

24

v.

Aquilla WILLIAMSON18,19,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50 was born about 1808 in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville. He lived with his parents in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville in 1810. He lived with his widowed mother in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville in 1820. Aquilla lived with his widowed mother in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville in 1825. This date is known from the guardianship papers of his mother. His name was taken from his mother's uncle, Aquilla Whitaker, one of Kentucky's leading Indian fighters and a friend of his father's.

His father was burnt by Indians a few years after his birth.

25

vi.

James WILLIAMSON18,19,42,43,44,45,46,47,48,49,50,51 was born in 1809 in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville. He lived with his parents in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville in 1810. He lived with his widowed mother in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville in 1820. James lived with his widowed mother in KY, Shelby Co., Shelbyville in August 1826. This is known per the guardianship papers of Charity Williamson. His father was burnt by Indians when he was 4 years old.

He is possibly a twin of Bland H. Williamson.

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vii.

Bland Harrison WILLIAMSON.