Fourth Generation


70. Bladen A. WILLIAMSON75,106,108,112 was born in 1832 in KY. Between 1848 and 1865 he was a brickmason . He lived with his uncle John W. Williamson in KY, Jefferson Co., Dist. 1 on 2 October 1850. Bladen lived in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola in 1855. He lived with his brothers in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 21 July 1860. Between 1866 and 1871 he was a farmer in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. Bladen lived in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 23 June 1870. He died in 1871 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. He was buried in 1871 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. “B. A. Williamson (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Mississippi County, Ark., and was born in the Blue Grass State, in 1820 [sic]. He passed his youth on his father’s farm, and subsequently learned the brickmason’s trade. Later in life he went to Louisville, Ky., worked at his trade for about 8 years, and then in 1855 he came to Arkansas, where he settled on the Mississippi River, about three miles above Osceola. He located on a tract of wild land, which he soon submitted to a course of improvement, and which was transformed into a remarkably pleasant home. After making many improvements he sold out in 1861, at a large advance, and then bought a choice location in the vicinity, which Mrs. Williamson still owns. Mr. Williamson was married in November, 1861, to Miss Lithe [sic] Jane Hale [see sketch of Hale Bros.], and immediately afterward the war broke out. Farming was almost suspended, but Mr. Williamson found employment at his trade, and nearly all the brick chimneys of that time were of his construction. He made many improvements on his farm, erecting buildings and clearing about 70 acres. In 1871, after an unusually active and prosperous life, Mr. Williamson received his final summons. Since then Mrs. Williamson has opened up about twenty acres, has conducted the home place, and now has no trouble in renting the farm for $600 or $700 annually. This land is very productive, and has often yielded one and a half bales of cotton to the acre. In 1884 Mrs. Williamson bought a pleasant residence in Osceola, which she has improved and made into a pleasant home. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Williamson were born six children, only one now living: Eliza Ann died at the age of ten years; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of Abner Driver, and resides in this county; James Edward died at the age of seven years; Levina died at the age of fifteen years, and two died in infancy. Mrs. Williamson has since married her deceased husband’s brother, Bland W.[sic] Williamson. The family are now living in a very pleasant cottage in Osceola.”

“Osceola Royal Arch Chapter No. 57 was organized March 1, 1871, with the following charter members: George A. Dannely, B. A. Williamson, F. C. Morris, A. K. Nash, W. A. Ferring, J. F. Davies, J. S. Mahan, C. C. Morris, George Fafford.”

"At the commencement of the Civil War the people of Mississippi County, though loyal and patriotic, finally decided to go with the State, and were a unit in favor of the cause of secession. The war spirit ran high, affecting rich and poor alike. If there was any Union sentiment in the county (and there was at first), it soon succumbed to the influences in favor of a separate Confederacy."

"There were no regular battles fought in this county, though it suffered greatly from predatory raids by Federal cavalry from Missouri and Kansas. Business of every interest was suspended, and people lived in constant apprehension of being raided, captured and killed."

"The Federal troops stationed at Fort Pillow often came into Mississippi County, and, on one occasion, supplied themselves with material for building barracks at the fort, by taking away the houses of Osceola."

"In 1868 Mississippi County was under martial law, and a regiment of State militia was quartered upon the people. Upon the withdrawal of the militia, the people again returned to their industries–though large numbers of the best citizens had fled from the county–and again the prospects of the county began to brighten, only to be again disturbed and disorganized by an insurrection of the blacks in 1872."

Bladen A. WILLIAMSON and Letha Jane "Lucy" HALE were married in November 1861 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. Letha Jane "Lucy" HALE108,112,113,191,192,193 was born in December 1835 in TN. She lived in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 23 June 1870. Her niece, Mary Speed, lived with them. She lived in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 14 June 1880. Her niece, Mary Speed, lived with them. Lucy lived in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 1 June 1900. She lived in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola, Church St. on 27 April 1910. She lived in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola, Bard Ave. in 1920.

Bladen A. WILLIAMSON and Letha Jane "Lucy" HALE had the following children:

171

i.

(unknown) WILLIAMSON108 was born between 1861 and 1879 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. He/she died between 1861 and 1879 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. "B. A. Williamson (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Mississippi County, Ark., and was born in the Blue Grass State, in 1820 [sic]. He passed his youth on his father's farm, and subsequently learned the brickmason's trade. Later in life he went to Louisville, Ky., worked at his trade for about 8 years, and then in 1855 he came to Arkansas, where he settled on the Mississippi River, about three miles above Osceola. He located on a tract of wild land, which he soon submitted to a course of improvement, and which was transformed into a remarkably pleasant home. After making many improvements he sold out in 1861, at a large advance, and then bought a choice location in the vicinity, which Mrs. Williamson still owns. Mr. Williamson was married in November, 1861, to Miss Lithe [sic] Jane Hale [see sketch of Hale Bros.], and immediately afterward the war broke out. Farming was almost suspended, but Mr. Williamson found employment at his trade, and nearly all the brick chimneys of that time were of his construction. He made many improvements on his farm, erecting buildings and clearing about 70 acres. In 1871, after an unusually active and prosperous life, Mr. Williamson received his final summons. Since then Mrs. Williamson has opened up about twenty acres, has conducted the home place, and now has no trouble in renting the farm for $600 or $700 annually. This land is very productive, and has often yielded one and a half bales of cotton to the acre. In 1884 Mrs. Williamson bought a pleasant residence in Osceola, which she has improved and made into a pleasant home. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Williamson were born six children, only one now living: Eliza Ann died at the age of ten years; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of Abner Driver, and resides in this county; James Edward died at the age of seven years; Levina died at the age of fifteen years, and two died in infancy. Mrs. Williamson has since married her deceased husband's brother, Bland W.[sic] Williamson. The family are now living in a very pleasant cottage in Osceola."

172

ii.

(unknown) WILLIAMSON108 was born between 1861 and 1879 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. He/she died between 1861 and 1879 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. "B. A. Williamson (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Mississippi County, Ark., and was born in the Blue Grass State, in 1820 [sic]. He passed his youth on his father's farm, and subsequently learned the brickmason's trade. Later in life he went to Louisville, Ky., worked at his trade for about 8 years, and then in 1855 he came to Arkansas, where he settled on the Mississippi River, about three miles above Osceola. He located on a tract of wild land, which he soon submitted to a course of improvement, and which was transformed into a remarkably pleasant home. After making many improvements he sold out in 1861, at a large advance, and then bought a choice location in the vicinity, which Mrs. Williamson still owns. Mr. Williamson was married in November, 1861, to Miss Lithe [sic] Jane Hale [see sketch of Hale Bros.], and immediately afterward the war broke out. Farming was almost suspended, but Mr. Williamson found employment at his trade, and nearly all the brick chimneys of that time were of his construction. He made many improvements on his farm, erecting buildings and clearing about 70 acres. In 1871, after an unusually active and prosperous life, Mr. Williamson received his final summons. Since then Mrs. Williamson has opened up about twenty acres, has conducted the home place, and now has no trouble in renting the farm for $600 or $700 annually. This land is very productive, and has often yielded one and a half bales of cotton to the acre. In 1884 Mrs. Williamson bought a pleasant residence in Osceola, which she has improved and made into a pleasant home. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Williamson were born six children, only one now living: Eliza Ann died at the age of ten years; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of Abner Driver, and resides in this county; James Edward died at the age of seven years; Levina died at the age of fifteen years, and two died in infancy. Mrs. Williamson has since married her deceased husband's brother, Bland W.[sic] Williamson. The family are now living in a very pleasant cottage in Osceola."

173

iii.

Eliza Ann WILLIAMSON108,112 was born in 1863 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. She lived with her parents in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 23 June 1870. She died in 1873 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. "B. A. Williamson (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Mississippi County, Ark., and was born in the Blue Grass State, in 1820 [sic]. He passed his youth on his father's farm, and subsequently learned the brickmason's trade. Later in life he went to Louisville, Ky., worked at his trade for about 8 years, and then in 1855 he came to Arkansas, where he settled on the Mississippi River, about three miles above Osceola. He located on a tract of wild land, which he soon submitted to a course of improvement, and which was transformed into a remarkably pleasant home. After making many improvements he sold out in 1861, at a large advance, and then bought a choice location in the vicinity, which Mrs. Williamson still owns. Mr. Williamson was married in November, 1861, to Miss Lithe [sic] Jane Hale [see sketch of Hale Bros.], and immediately afterward the war broke out. Farming was almost suspended, but Mr. Williamson found employment at his trade, and nearly all the brick chimneys of that time were of his construction. He made many improvements on his farm, erecting buildings and clearing about 70 acres. In 1871, after an unusually active and prosperous life, Mr. Williamson received his final summons. Since then Mrs. Williamson has opened up about twenty acres, has conducted the home place, and now has no trouble in renting the farm for $600 or $700 annually. This land is very productive, and has often yielded one and a half bales of cotton to the acre. In 1884 Mrs. Williamson bought a pleasant residence in Osceola, which she has improved and made into a pleasant home. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Williamson were born six children, only one now living: Eliza Ann died at the age of ten years; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of Abner Driver, and resides in this county; James Edward died at the age of seven years; Levina died at the age of fifteen years, and two died in infancy. Mrs. Williamson has since married her deceased husband's brother, Bland W.[sic] Williamson. The family are now living in a very pleasant cottage in Osceola."

+174

iv.

Mary Elizabeth WILLIAMSON.

175

v.

James Edward WILLIAMSON108,112 was born in 1867 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. He lived with his parents in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 23 June 1870. He died in 1874 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. "B. A. Williamson (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Mississippi County, Ark., and was born in the Blue Grass State, in 1820 [sic]. He passed his youth on his father's farm, and subsequently learned the brickmason's trade. Later in life he went to Louisville, Ky., worked at his trade for about 8 years, and then in 1855 he came to Arkansas, where he settled on the Mississippi River, about three miles above Osceola. He located on a tract of wild land, which he soon submitted to a course of improvement, and which was transformed into a remarkably pleasant home. After making many improvements he sold out in 1861, at a large advance, and then bought a choice location in the vicinity, which Mrs. Williamson still owns. Mr. Williamson was married in November, 1861, to Miss Lithe [sic] Jane Hale [see sketch of Hale Bros.], and immediately afterward the war broke out. Farming was almost suspended, but Mr. Williamson found employment at his trade, and nearly all the brick chimneys of that time were of his construction. He made many improvements on his farm, erecting buildings and clearing about 70 acres. In 1871, after an unusually active and prosperous life, Mr. Williamson received his final summons. Since then Mrs. Williamson has opened up about twenty acres, has conducted the home place, and now has no trouble in renting the farm for $600 or $700 annually. This land is very productive, and has often yielded one and a half bales of cotton to the acre. In 1884 Mrs. Williamson bought a pleasant residence in Osceola, which she has improved and made into a pleasant home. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Williamson were born six children, only one now living: Eliza Ann died at the age of ten years; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of Abner Driver, and resides in this county; James Edward died at the age of seven years; Levina died at the age of fifteen years, and two died in infancy. Mrs. Williamson has since married her deceased husband's brother, Bland W.[sic] Williamson. The family are now living in a very pleasant cottage in Osceola."

176

vi.

Levina "Lucy" WILLIAMSON108,112,113 was born in 1869 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. She lived with her parents in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 23 June 1870. She lived with her mother and stepfather in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola on 14 June 1880. Her uncle became her stepfather. Lucy died in 1884 in AR, Mississippi Co., Osceola. "B. A. Williamson (deceased) was a prominent farmer of Mississippi County, Ark., and was born in the Blue Grass State, in 1820 [sic]. He passed his youth on his father's farm, and subsequently learned the brickmason's trade. Later in life he went to Louisville, Ky., worked at his trade for about 8 years, and then in 1855 he came to Arkansas, where he settled on the Mississippi River, about three miles above Osceola. He located on a tract of wild land, which he soon submitted to a course of improvement, and which was transformed into a remarkably pleasant home. After making many improvements he sold out in 1861, at a large advance, and then bought a choice location in the vicinity, which Mrs. Williamson still owns. Mr. Williamson was married in November, 1861, to Miss Lithe [sic] Jane Hale [see sketch of Hale Bros.], and immediately afterward the war broke out. Farming was almost suspended, but Mr. Williamson found employment at his trade, and nearly all the brick chimneys of that time were of his construction. He made many improvements on his farm, erecting buildings and clearing about 70 acres. In 1871, after an unusually active and prosperous life, Mr. Williamson received his final summons. Since then Mrs. Williamson has opened up about twenty acres, has conducted the home place, and now has no trouble in renting the farm for $600 or $700 annually. This land is very productive, and has often yielded one and a half bales of cotton to the acre. In 1884 Mrs. Williamson bought a pleasant residence in Osceola, which she has improved and made into a pleasant home. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Williamson were born six children, only one now living: Eliza Ann died at the age of ten years; Mary Elizabeth is the wife of Abner Driver, and resides in this county; James Edward died at the age of seven years; Levina died at the age of fifteen years, and two died in infancy. Mrs. Williamson has since married her deceased husband's brother, Bland W.[sic] Williamson. The family are now living in a very pleasant cottage in Osceola."