Fifth Generation


273. Samuel Alexander WILLIAMSON292,293,298,299,433,434,435,436,437 was born on 25 May 1875 in IN, Knox Co., Sandborn. He lived with his parents in MO, Iron Co., Kaolin on 12 June 1880. He lived in MO, Iron Co., Kaolin on 22 June 1900. On 22 June 1900 Samuel was a farmer in MO, Iron Co., Kaolin. He lived in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Bismark Rd. on 4 May 1910. Samuel's daughter Lulu was living with her grandmother, Melissa Williamson, in Randolph, St. Francois Co., MO. Sometimes, however, she would travel over to see her father and siblings. Her son, Gerald Jostes, remembers her saying that when she was 7, she got to her father's house after the census taker had been there. This would explain why she is not shown on the 1910 census under either her father or her grandmother. He registered for the WWI draft in MO, St. Francois Co. on 12 September 1918 . He lived in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Elvins, Rt. 1 on 12 September 1918. On 12 September 1918 Samuel was a miner for St. Joseph Lead Co., Shift 8 in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Elvins, Rt. 1. He lived in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood, Main St. on 22 January 1920. His daughter Lulu lived with him. They lived next to Sam's daughter, Alice Brewer and her husband Otis. Next to Alice lived Joe and Mary Brewer, Otis's parents, and Emma Kemp, Otis's sister. Emma Kemp would become Samuel's third wife. So a father and daughter Williamson married a brother and sister Brewer. On 22 January 1920 he was a blacksmith in the Mitchell Mine in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood. The Hoffman Mill in Mitchell, MO was owned by the St. Joseph Lead Co. based in Bonne Terre, MO. Samuel lived in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood on 2 April 1930. His stepson Willis Kemp lived with them. He died of labor pneumonia in his right lower lung on 28 January 1937 in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood. He was hospitalized from January 20-28, 1937 and died on the 28th at 3:15pm. He was buried on 31 January 1937 in MO, Washington Co., Harmony, Quaker [Antioch] Cemetery. He was buried by J. S. Boyer and Son Funeral Home, Leadwood, St. Francois Co., MO. Samuel was tall, slender, and had blue eyes and black hair.
From the recollections of Gerald Jostes, Sam's grandson:

"REMEMBERING SAM WILLIAMSON"

Here are some things that I remember about my Grandfather Sam. I was 10 years old when he died. Some things just leave an impression when you are young. For instance, during a meal, Grandpa Sam never used a glass to drink water...he used a sauce pan. He had the sauce pan full of water right by his plate and would drink from it during the meal. I don't know why and I never could find out why.

Sam also would only eat one thing at a time. If he were eating meat, carrots, and potatoes, he would put only the carrots on the plate and eat that; then the potatoes; then the meat. He would never mix his food. He also was never known to drink coffee, which was the main drink those days. My mother never drank coffee, and I never drank coffee except when I was in the Navy.

Grandpa Sam worked in the lead mines all his life. His main job was being a blacksmith and shoeing and feeding the mules down in the mine. The mules were taken down into the mine and never left it. After a while, they would go blind but they knew their way around the mine without any trouble, just like they could see. Another of Sam's jobs was starting the water pumps when a well would fill up with water. There was always water in the mines, and the water would run into a big well and when the well got full, pumps had to be started to pump the water out. Sam knew just about when the well would fill up, and he would take off his one shoe and one sock and hang his foot over the side into the well. He would then take a nap. When the water rose and hit his foot it would wake him up and he would start the pumps and go back to work with the mules.

Leadwood was a really depressed area and Grandpa Sam and his family were always really poor. For a wedding present, his first wife Mamie made him a little book from the only thing she had--little scraps of material. She sewed decorative stitches around the pages with scraps of yarn, and then put in a couple of buttons and a bead. It was all she had. It's the only thing the family has of her now.

Grandpa Sam's second wife, Emma Heinrich, was a real witch. She was so mean my mom [Lulu] would never say her name again. My mom lived with Melissa [her grandmother] and she would come back to visit Sam her father for a month or so. Emma used to beat and abuse her and Alice something terrible, and say stuff like, "If you ever tell, I'll kill you." She would act all nice around Sam, and then when he went off to work, she would start in on my mother and Alice. I don't know about Martin--he pretty much stayed with Uncle Claud. Anyway, Sam came home one day and caught her at it. We don't know if somebody told him or he just came home early. The story from Uncle Claude is that he then took her and threw her into the road, and all her clothes with her, and told her to never come back. After that they were divorced.

Sam was also superstitious about cats and lightning. Once when we were visiting Grandpa Sam at Leadwood, a bad thunderstorm came up. We were all sitting on the porch and a cat ran under the porch to get out of the rain. I thought that Sam was going to have a fit. He made Willis (Willis Kemp, third wife Emma's son by a previous marriage) get a broom and crawl under the porch and chase that cat away. Grandpa Sam said that a cat will draw lightning every time.

Grandpa Sam also kept every single paycheck he had ever received. That was 37 years worth from the mine. In all that time he watched, but he never found any paycheck that was off by even a penny.

My Grandpa Sam farmed some, even when he was working in the mines. That's why it says “farmer” on his death certificate. After he retired from the mines, he bought a farm on the outskirts of Leadwood. It didn't have a house-just a barn. He lived in Leadwood in the house where I was later born. I remember riding on the wagon at the farm with Grandpa Sam. He had mules, and he raised corn and pigs. I think he had pigs. Yeah, he probably did, because I remember my mom telling me the story of how it was the middle of the Depression and Christmas, and my mom and dad only had beans to eat. They didn't know what they were going to do. Then a railway expressman came and delivered a package from Grandpa Sam. When they opened it, they found a big ham. My mom sat down and cried and cried because now they wouldn't starve.

Grandpa Sam also had a habit of appearing to be asleep during the sermon at Sunday church. He always sat in the front row and when the preacher began his sermon Sam would close his eyes and appear to be asleep. Every so often the preacher would accuse Sam of sleeping during the sermon. Sam then would tell the preacher everything that the preacher said. This went on for years until the preacher gave up. My mother said that Sam did sleep during the sermons, but when the preacher would get on him, he could tell the preacher what was said since the preacher always preached the same thing!

Sam told this story to two fellows after church one Sunday not knowing that I was listening just around the other side of the car--
"One Sunday, during the sermon, the railing on the choir loft broke and one lady that was in the choir fell over the edge. However the bottom of her dress caught on the broken post and there she hung, her dress over her head and everything was showing. The preacher hollered from the pulpit that anybody who looked at the poor lady would be struck blind. Two old guys were sitting in the back of the church... one old guy said to the other...I'm going to risk one eye!!"

Sam and his brother Claude could really tell some tall tales.

When Grandpa Sam died, he lay in state in an open casket in the living room of his house. My dad and Uncle Otis [Brewer] stayed up all night with him. That was the way you did it in those days--it was a mark of respect. The next day he was taken to the local church in the old Essex and then to the cemetery at Quaker. In those days the roads to Quaker were very bad and the road crossed several creeks. There were no bridges and the cars would just drive across the creeks. In some places the cars had to drive into the creek and go upstream for a ways to get to a place where they could get out of the creek. The water was a little high the day he was to be buried and several cars got flooded and had to be pushed or pulled out of the creek. The Essex got flooded too. The men had to take off their shoes and socks and roll up their pants legs and wade into the water to get the car started. But we finally made it to Quaker [now Antioch]Cemetery.

Samuel Alexander WILLIAMSON and Mamie Catherine MARTIN were married on 13 March 1898 in MO, Iron Co., Montana. The word "Montia" on their marriage certificate is a corruption of "Montana." Montana was the previous name of Enough, MO, which is now under Council Bluff Lake.

From the recollections of Gerald Jostes 5 Mar 2008:

"There was a small collection of houses, outlying farms and a post office. [This was originally known as Montana.--ed]. When the residents wanted to be officially recognized, they had to get a lot of signatures on the government form. After getting most of the inhabitants to sign, someone said, "That's enough!" The community had a sense of humor, so they decided to name the community 'Enough.'

I took my mom [Lulu] back several times. The family farm was outside the town. All that was left were some foundations and some buildings in town. The government evicted the remaining people and flooded the site, and it became the Council Bluff Lake. So all of Enough and the farmstead is now under the lake. There is a boat ramp there called the 'Enough Boat Ramp.' That's where the town was."

Mamie Catherine MARTIN293,299,436 was born in March 1879 in MO, Washington Co., Harmony. She lived in MO, Iron Co., Kaolin on 22 June 1900. She died in 1904 in MO, Iron Co., Kaolin. Mamie was buried in 1904 in MO, Washington Co., Harmony, Quaker [Antioch] Cemetery. Her father, James Madison Martin, had 2 wives, both sisters, Elizabeth and Mary Agnes Ivy. Mary Agnes was Mamie's mother. She died, however, when Mamie was 2 years old.

There still remains some confusion as to whether her name was Mamie Catherine or Catherine Mamie.

From the recollection of Gerald Jostes, Mamie's grandson, 3 MAR 2008:

"Melissa, my great-grandmother, was a 'granny lady'. That's what they called midwives in those days. She used to get up on a mule with her bag and go all over the county on her mule to deliver babies. That's how she brought in extra money back then--they were so poor it was a good thing she could help out.
When Mamie was pregnant with my mother, Lulu, Melissa assured her she would be there to deliver her baby.One day, a husband sent for Melissa to help his wife--would she come? Mamie was close to delivering, but Melissa thought she could get to where the man lived, deliver the baby, and get home before Mamie delivered.
But it turned into a long, dragged out birth, and Melissa was gone for many days. Meanwhile, Mamie went into labor and Sam went to their nearest neighbor for help. The neighbor had a bunch of kids, but she had never delivered any. We don't know if she had anything to do with it, but Mamie gave birth and later died. It was probably some kind of infection.
[Great] Uncle Claude [Sam's brother] was the one who told me this, and we don't know what he meant by "later died"--was it an hour, a couple of days? We don't know. But Melissa never forgave herself for not being there.

Mamie was a really talented woman. She wrote poetry. We have a poem she wrote about 2 lovers--really a sad one. She could also play any stringed instrument. She didn't read music--just played by ear. All the Martins were musicians. They each played an instrument and had a family band. They played for themselves and at weddings and things.

Leadwood was a really depressed area and Sam and Mamie were really poor. For her wedding present to him, Mamie made a little book from the only things she had--little scraps of material. She sewed decorative stitches around the pages with scraps of yarn, and then put in a couple of buttons and a bead. It was all she had to give. It's the only thing the family has of her now, except for her poem."

"The Martin family was...well...different. Mamie had another sister by the name of Jane. My mother took me to visit her once or twice. Aunt Jane, as she was called, married a man named Crocker. They had a small house set way back in the woods. Aunt Jane had quite a few children. I don't know what happened to her husband. Aunt Jane was like something out of the TV show, "The Beverly Hillbillies." She smoked a corncob pipe and grew her own tobacco. She would set on her front porch in a rocking chair with a shotgun on her lap. She was a very good shot with the shotgun. She had a big garden and if a rabbit or mostly squirrels came near her garden she would shoot the varmit from the porch. This also made for good eating as meat was scarce.

Anyway she had a son, whose name I don't remember, who decided to rob the bank in Belgrade, MO. He took some of his mother's clothes and put them on, took his shotgun and went into town. He went into the bank and robbed it. However, he had lived in the area his whole life so the people in the bank knew who he was and also they recognized his mother's clothes. They called the sheriff and told him they had been held up by the Crocker boy. The sheriff went out to Aunt Jane's and sat on the porch talking to Aunt Jane until the boy came home. The boy had stopped in the woods and hid the money and his mother's clothes before coming home. The sheriff took him to jail. He was tried in court and sentenced to 10 years in the state pen at Jefferson City. He served 7 years and was released. I don't know what he did after he got out of jail. He was not too good as a bank robber."

Samuel Alexander WILLIAMSON and Mamie Catherine MARTIN had the following children:

+491

i.

Martin Davis WILLIAMSON.

+492

ii.

Alice Martha WILLIAMSON.

+493

iii.

Lula Belle WILLIAMSON.

Samuel Alexander WILLIAMSON and Emma M. HENNRICH were married on 12 July 1906 in MO, St. Francois Co., Farmington. They were married in the Methodist Episcopal Church by L. M. Thompson. Emma M. HENNRICH298,438,439 was born in May 1873 in MO, St. Francois Co., Pendleton. She lived with her parents in MO, St. Francois Co., Pendleton on 10 June 1880. She lived with her widowed mother in MO, St. Francois Co., Pendleton on 19 June 1900. Emma lived in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Bismark Rd. on 4 May 1910. Her parents were Fritz and Otilda Hennrich, both from Germany.

From the recollections of Gerald Jostes, grandson of Sam Williamson, 3 MAR 2008:

"Grandpa Sam's second wife, Emma Heinrich, was a real witch. She was so mean my mom [Lulu] would never say her name again. Sam married Emma when my mom was about 2. My mom lived with Melissa [her grandmother] and she would come back to visit Sam for a month or so. Emma used to beat and abuse her and Alice something terrible, and say stuff like, "If you ever tell, I'll kill you." She would act all nice around Sam, and then when he went off to work, she would start in on my mother and Alice. I don't know about Martin--he pretty much stayed with Uncle Claud. This went on for years. Anyway, Sam came home one day and caught her at it. We don't know if somebody told him or he just came home early. The story from Uncle Claude is that he then took her and threw her into the road, and all her clothes with her, and told her to never come back. After that they were divorced."

Samuel Alexander WILLIAMSON and Emma BREWER were married on 27 January 1920 in MO, St. Francois Co., Flat River. Emma BREWER434,435,440 was born on 4 May 1896 in MO, Iron Co., Annapolis. She lived close to her future husband Sam Williamson in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood, Main St. on 22 January 1920. She lived in her parents' house with her son. Her brother Otis, who lived next door, was married to Alice Williamson. Alice was the daughter of Emma's future husband, Samuel Williamson. On 22 January 1920 she took in washing for a private family in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood. Emma lived in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood on 2 April 1930. She died on 4 August 1976 in AL, Morgan Co., Decatur. She was buried on 6 August 1976 in AL, Morgan Co., Decatur. She was buried by Shelton Funeral Home. Emma was a member of the First Church of God in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood. In the last years of her life, she went to Decatur, Alabama to live with her daughter, Mary Lee Williamson Dodson.

Samuel Alexander WILLIAMSON and Emma BREWER had the following children:

494

i.

Mary Lee WILLIAMSON was born on 1 September 1929 in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood. She lived with her parents in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood on 2 April 1930.