Sixth Generation


493. Lula Belle WILLIAMSON298,299,434,443 was born on 4 January 1903 in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood. She lived with her grandmother Melissa Williamson in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph on 4 May 1910. From the recollections of Gerald Jostes, her son, 6 Mar 2008:

"Mom lived with her grandparents George and Melissa from the time she was born. She would go back to visit her father for about a month at a time. She told me one time that she left her grandmother's house before the census taker came [15 Apr 1910], and left her father's house before the census taker came there [4 May 1910], so she never showed up on the census at all."

She lived with her father in MO, St. Francois Co., Randolph, Leadwood, Main St. on 22 January 1920. Lula lived in MO, St. Louis (Independent City), 2429 Lemp Ave. on 10 April 1930. Her husband's sister and husband, Emma and James Fitzgibbons, lived with them. She died on 2 July 1984 in IL, Randolph Co., Chester. She was buried in July 1984 in IL, Randolph Co., Prairie du Rocher, St. Joseph Cemetery. Lula was a Baptist who married a Catholic. Her children were raised Catholic.. From recollections of Gerald Jostes, her son:

"Melissa, my great-grandmother, was a 'granny lady'. That's what they called midwives in those days. She used to get up on a mule with her bag and go all over the county to deliver babies. That's how she brought in extra money back then--they were so poor it was a good thing she could help out.
When her daughter Mamie was pregnant with my mother, Lulu, Melissa assured Mamie she would be there to deliver her baby. One day, a husband sent for Melissa to help his wife--would she come? Mamie was close to delivering, but Melissa thought she could get to where the man lived, deliver the baby, and get home before her daughter Mamie delivered.
But it turned into a long, dragged out birth, and Melissa was gone for many days. Meanwhile, Mamie went into labor and Sam went to their nearest neighbor for help. Now the neighbor had a bunch of kids, but she had never delivered any. We don't know if she had anything to do with it, but Mamie gave birth and later died. It was probably some kind of infection. [Great] Uncle Claude [Sam's brother] was the one who told me this, and we don't know what he meant by "later died"--was it an hour, a couple of days? We don't know. But Melissa never forgave herself for not being there.

After Lulu's mother Mamie died in childbirth, her father Sam left his farm at Enough and moved to Leadwood to work in the mines. My mom Lulu lived with Melissa and George [her grandparents] and Alice went with her father. Even though she was very young, Alice kept house for her father Sam. After a while Sam married Emma Heinrich. Every so often George and Melissa would bring my mother to Leadwood to live with her father and sister for a while. George died when my mother was very young.

Grandpa Sam's second wife, Emma Heinrich, was a real witch. She hated the girls. Emma used to whip, beat and abuse her and Alice something terrible, and say stuff like, "If you ever tell, I'll kill you." She would act all nice around Sam, and then when he went off to work, she would start in on my mother and Alice. I don't know about Martin--he pretty much stayed with Uncle Claude. Anyway, Sam came home one day and caught her at it. We don't know if somebody told him or he just came home early. The story from Uncle Claude is that he then hit her with his fist alongside her head and took her and threw her into the road, and all her clothes with her, and told her to never come back and to stay away from the girls. Sam was arrested for wife beating and had to go to court. The judge fined him $10 and when Sam said if she came around the girls he would do it again, the judge then fined him $5 more. After that they were divorced. I was 40+ years old when she first mentioned her stepmother, and even then she would not give me her name. She said that she would never have that woman's name cross her lips. I later got Emma Heinrich's name from Uncle Claude.

My mom always considered that it was her grandmother Melissa who raised her.

No one kept a record of the date of [my grandmother's] death or the birth date of my mother Lulu. The church records were destroyed when the church burned down, so my mother never knew how old she was. To get her Social Security she had Uncle Claude to make a statement as to her birthday. I was there when Uncle Claude asked her how old she wanted to be, as he would tell them anything.

When my mom was expecting me, she didn't have anybody up there in St. Louis to help her. So she went down to Leadwood to stay with Emma (Sam's 3rd wife) and Sam until I was born. When she started having labor pains, they had a neighbor who had a telephone call my dad in St. Louis to tell him the baby was on the way. My dad left after work because they couldn't afford for him to lose out on any money. But when he pulled up to the door, the doctor was just leaving. My mom later wrote a poem about my dad racing the stork, and the stork won. I've still got her original, handwritten poem."

"After her grandfather George died, my mom continued to live with her grandmother, Melissa, until Melissa died. After that she more or less was on her own. She started working in restaurants in the various towns in the area--Ironton, Desloge, Leadwood, and others. She would work in one for a while and then move to another town. She stayed with various relatives and friends. Every so often she would move back with her father Sam and sister Alice.

She and a girlfriend decided to move to St. Louis as they heard they could get a job at Bemis Bros. Bag Co. located on 2nd St. in south St. Louis. While working at Bemis she met and became friends with 2 sisters. They had a brother who also worked at Bemis. Clem J. Jostes and Lulu started dating, usually with one or both of the sisters and their boyfriends. However, for some reason the romance cooled and Lulu left St. Louis and moved to DeSoto, MO, where she roomed with a girlfriend and started working in a restaurant. After about a month in DeSoto, Lulu sent a postcard to Clem. The only thing on the card was, "Do you remember the good times we had?" That was all, no name or anything. The following weekend Clem jumped into his Model T Ford and went to DeSoto. He HAD remembered. Several weeks later they were married.

But they had to be different about it! Clem got his best friend (a cousin) and Lulu got her best friend, and Clem and Lulu told their friends that they were just going for a ride in Clem's Model T. They went to the Hillsboro, MO court house (this was January 2, 1926) and surprise! they walked into the court house and got married. Their two friends didn't know anything about the impending marriage until they were called upon to be best man and maid of honor.

Now, since Clem was Catholic and Lulu was Baptist, they got married again at Assumption Catholic Church in south St. Louis with the same 2 friends. This was on January 6, 1926. Lulu had to sign a covenant that any children would be raised Catholic. This she did faithfully. Even though much pressure was put on her later to join the Catholic Church, she remained true to her Baptist faith until she died.

From the recollections of Sue Jostes Kriegshauser, her granddaughter, on 10 Mar 2008:

"Granny was the best! That's what she wanted to be called--Granny. I guess it was a throwback to her own grandmother, who was a 'granny lady'. Granny always did things for others. And she was really hospitable. Everyone was always invited over to a meal. When I was a little girl, she would draw things for me. I wish I had some of her drawings now. I remember one in particular--it was a little girl facing sideways with a sunbonnet on her head. I asked her who that was and she said, "That's me." It was quite good too.

Granny didn't really tell jokes, but she had a very sharp wit. You had to be sharp to hold your own in OUR family! And she could really tell stories. She liked to poke fun at herself too. I remember one time when she lived down at the farm, she tried to jump the ditch in front of her house. She didn't make it and fell and bruised herself all up. Later, I asked her why she had jumped. She said, "Well, in my mind I'm still 32 and I could jump good at 32!" She was in her 70s at the time.

I think that's why everyone liked her--she kept a young mind."

Lula Belle WILLIAMSON and Clement Joseph JOSTES were married on 2 January 1926 in MO, Jefferson Co., Hillsboro. Clement Joseph JOSTES299,443 was born on 30 April 1902 in IL, Randolph Co., Modoc. He lived with his parents in IL, Randolph Co., Brewerville on 27 April 1910.518 He lived in his stepfather Andrew Molly's household in IL, Randolph Co., Ellis Grove on 21 January 1920.519 Clement lived with his sisters Emma and Laura in MO, St. Louis (Independent City), 1010A Arsenal in 1923. In 1923 he worked at Bemis Bag Co. as a pressman in MO, St. Louis (Independent City). He lived in MO, St. Louis (Independent City), 2809A S. 9th St. in January 1926. Clement lived in MO, St. Louis (Independent City), 2411 S. 18th St. in 1927. He lived in MO, St. Louis (Independent City), 2429 Lemp Ave. on 10 April 1930.443 His sister Emma and her husband James Fitzgibbons lived with them. On 10 April 1930 he worked at Gaylord Box Company in MO, St. Louis (Independent City). Clement lived in MO, St. Louis (Independent City), 2340 S. 11th St. in 1931. He lived in MO, St. Louis (Independent City), 1109 Sidney St. in 1937. He lived in MO, St. Louis Co., Lemay, 3715 Bobring Ave. in 1940. Clement owned a farm in 1945 in IL, Randolph Co., Modoc. He lived on his farm in IL, Randolph Co., Modoc in 1967. He was buried in May 1973 in IL, Randolph Co., Prairie du Rocher, St. Joseph Cemetery. Clement died in the hospital of cirrhosis of the liver on 19 May 1973 in IL, Randolph Co., Chester. He was educated at St. Leo's School in IL, Randolph Co., Prairie du Rocher. Clem loved rabbit and squirrel hunting. He and Lula also did extensive traveling in the US. . From the recollections of Gerald Jostes, his son, on 6 Mar 2008:

"During the Depression my dad worked for the Gaylord Box Company (?). Mr. Gaylord was a really great man. Instead of laying off workers, he would let everyone come in for ½ day, just to give them some work so they could have a little bit of money to feed their families. I don't remember how much they got-it was about $1 an hour or so.

One week, there just wasn't enough work for ANY of the workers to have more than about 1 hour of work. So my dad went in and worked his hour, but he was so depressed that he took his work money and on the way home he stopped in a bar and got drunk. Then they didn't have any money that week. I don't know how they got by. My mom said it was the only time she ever saw him drunk. And she didn't know how he got that way on just a dollar!

When my mom was expecting me, she didn't have anybody up there in St. Louis to help her. So she went down to Leadwood to stay with Emma (Sam's 3rd wife) and Sam until I was born. When she started having labor pains, they had a neighbor who had a telephone call my dad in St. Louis to tell him the baby was on the way. My dad left after work because they couldn't afford for him to lose out on any money. But when he pulled up to the door, the doctor was just leaving. My mom later wrote a poem about my dad racing the stork, and the stork won. I've still got her original, handwritten poem."

From the recollections of Sue Jostes Kriegshauser, his granddaughter on 10 Mar 2008:

"When I was growing up, Granny and Grandpa Jostes always came to our house for Christmas Eve. We kids were always impatient for Santa to come that night. We would have a nice supper, and then invariably some adult would say we should all go and look at the pretty Christmas lights, which was the last thing we kids wanted to do, but had no choice. So adults and kids would bundle up, all except Grandpa. He worked hard, and was always tired when he came over. One year he fell asleep in his chair and Mom said not to wake him. Another year he was so tired he said to go on and let him rest up for the rest of the evening. Every year he was too tired to go with us.

So we'd get in the car and drive around for quite a while looking at the lights. And they were pretty looking because back then we usually had a lot of snow and the lights made colored patterns on it. And most people put up lights too.

Anyway, we would FINALLY get back to the house and find that Santa had come while we were gone! And Grandpa was asleep in his chair! We kids would start yelling and Granny would wake Grandpa up and ask if he had seen Santa. But he never did see him."

Lula Belle WILLIAMSON and Clement Joseph JOSTES had the following children:

+592

i.

Dale Forrest JOSTES.

593

ii.

Gerald Clem JOSTES was born on 26 October 1926.

594

iii.

Leon Earl JOSTES was born on 26 May 1928.

595

iv.

Ronald David JOSTES was born on 17 June 1937 in MO, St. Louis (Independent City).