Third Generation


36. Anne WILLIAMSON63,64,65,66,118,127,128,129,130 was born on 12 January 1815 in KY, Jefferson Co.. She lived with her parents in IN, Sullivan Co. in 1820. She lived with her parents in IN, Clinton Co. in 1830. Anne lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton in 1840. She lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 25 November 1850. She lived next to her son Williamson in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 20 July 1860. Anne lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 16 July 1870. Her son Osborn and his wife Helen were also in the household. She lived next to her sons Hill and Augustus in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 18 June 1880. Her granddaughter Nanie also was in the household. Some have said that Nanie was actually Nina, daughter of Joseph and Anne's son, Osborn Cox. However, Nina was the child of Osborn and his second wife Emma, who were married in 1881, and would not have been born yet at this time. She died on 11 May 1887 in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton. Anne was buried in May 1887 in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton, Hampton cemetery. She was named after her paternal grandmother.

She and her sister Juliette married brothers.

Anne WILLIAMSON and Joseph Bird COX were married on 20 March 1836 in IN, Clinton Co.. Joseph Bird COX65,66,118,127,128,129,130,131 was born on 2 December 1813 in IN, Wayne Co.. He emigrated in 1836 from IN to IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton. He lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton in 1840. Joseph lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 25 November 1850. He lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 20 July 1860. He lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 16 July 1870. Joseph lived in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 18 June 1880. He was buried in April 1888 in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton, Hampton cemetery. He died on 17 April 1888 in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton. Joseph was a Republican who voted for Abraham Lincoln. He was a Methodist Episcopalian. Four of his sons, Williamson, Augustus, Hill, and Washington, were in the Civil War

He was one of the first members at the first meeting of the “Early Settlers Club”, Sept 1866 held on Rock Island. He held the offices of Road Commissioner and School Director of Rock Island County, and other minor township offices.
“His word is as good as his bond, and his accumulation of this world’s goods is attributed not only to his early coming to the county, but to his good judgment and determination in “sticking to it” and overcoming all obstacles. He is…respected for his honest, straightforward, manly dealings with his fellow-man.”

From the book, "Portrait and Biographical Album of Rock Island Co., IL":
"Joseph B. Cox, one of the pioneer settlers of Hampton Township, coming here at a date when the hand of civilization was hardly visible in the township in which he located (in 1836) and having resided here constantly ever since, has witnessed the development of the county and experienced all the trials incident to the settlement of a new country. He came here in 1836 and located on section 15, Hampton Township, where he took up 160 acres of Government land and on which he has resided for a period of 48 years. He was born Dec. 2, 1813, in Wayne County, Ind. His parents, Joseph and Mary (Rue) Cox, came to Hampton Township in 1836, and his father took up Government land on section 3 of the same township on which he resided until his death.
Joseph B. Cox, subject of this sketch, remained at home until he attained the age of 22 years. His years prior to the age of majority were spent on the farm and in the acquisition of a good common-school education. Mr. Cox was united in marriage March 20, 1836, to Anne Williamson, a native of Kentucky, and of their nine children, eight survived."

Historical Note:
Hampton Twp. was well supplied with railroads: the Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific; the Chicago, Milwaukee, & St. Paul; the Chicago, Burlington, & Quincy, and the Davenport, Rock Island, & Northwestern all ran through the township. One of the principal points for supplies for farmers in the upper end of the county and even into Henry county was Hampton. Here they brought their grain and sold their pork, which was packed and shipped downriver by the steamboats.

Anne WILLIAMSON and Joseph Bird COX had the following children:

99

i.

Mary Ellen COX65,66,118,127,130,132 was born on 8 January 1837 in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton. She lived with her parents in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton in 1840. She lived with her parents in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 25 November 1850. Mary lived with her parents in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 20 July 1860. She lived with her parents in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 16 July 1870. She lived with her parents in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 18 June 1880. Mary died in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton.

+100

ii.

Williamson Moses COX.

+101

iii.

Augustus D. COX.

102

iv.

Washington R. COX65,66,129,130,133,134 was born in 1843 in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton. He lived with his parents in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 25 November 1850. He lived with his parents in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton on 20 July 1860. On 20 July 1860 Washington worked on his father's farm in IL, Rock Island Co., Hampton. On 11 August 1862 in IL, Cook Co., Chicago he enlisted in the as a Pvt. for the Union in Co. F, 89 IL Inf for 3 years in the Civil War. He waas enlisted by Wm. D. Williams.

From the "Historical Encyclopedia of Illinois and the History of Rock Island County":
"The Eighty-ninth Illinois Infantry, known as the Railroad regiment, was organized by the railroad companies of Illinois at Chicago, Ill., in August, 1862...It was...ordered to Louisville, Ky., and was assigned to Third Brigade, Second Division, Army of Kentucky, under General Nelson... On October 1st it was assigned to...McCook's Corps, General Buell's Army, and after helping to drive the forces of Bragg out of Kentucky, went forward to Nashville, Tenn., in time to take part in the battle of Stone River or Murfreesboro, Tenn."

Washington, however, never took part in the Battle of Stone River. Soon after he mustered in in mid-October 1862, he was captured by Rebel forces and made a prisoner for 4 months in rebel prisons. It is not known which prisons. He was then exchanged. Exchanged Union prisoners were sent to College Green Barracks on the grounds of St. John's College, Annapolis, MD, where they were given medical attention, fresh clothes, food, and their back pay. There was much sickness in the barracks, including smallpox and typhoid. Clara Barton and the nurses she trained oversaw the arrival of soldiers needing medical attention. Washington either arrived ill, possibly from his prison stays, or became ill at the barracks. It is possible he saw or was administered to by Clara Barton. He died there, however, in March 1863, and was buried in Annapolis National Cemetery. He mustered in the Civil War on 13 October 1862 in IL, Cook Co., Chicago. He died on 6 March 1863 in MD, Anne Arundel Co., Annapolis, St. John's College Hospital. He was buried in March 1863 in MD, Anne Arundel Co., Annapolis, Annapolis National Cemetery, IL Sec, Sec 1, Sec Gr 21, Grave #1653. Washington was 5'7-1/2" tall, with light hair, blue eyes, and a fair complexion.

+103

v.

Osborn Moses COX.

+104

vi.

Hill Kirby COX.

+105

vii.

Emeline Elizabeth "Emma" COX.

+106

viii.

Cassius Clay COX.

+107

ix.

Jason Joseph COX.